Cup of Inspiration "Thankful for Trials"
Thankful for Trials
 
By
 
Pamela A. Johnson
 
 
 
He can take our chaos and turn it into something meaningful and worthwhile.
--Joyce Meyers
 
 
 
          It was August of 1991, I was nineteen years old and just beginning my junior year in college. During my freshman and sophomore years, the guys I dated were all fellow college students, but one afternoon that would change. I was walking from campus to my off-campus apartment after spending a long, emotionally and physically draining day in the campus gymnasium registering for Fall classes. On my way home I met a man near the football stadium. I mean he was man, not a college student, he was a grown man in a brand new car. Suddenly visions flashed in my mind: dinner at somewhere other than the campus cafeteria, getting picked up in a car instead of meeting at the local subway station. I liked those visions. 
Needless to say, we exchanged phone numbers and a relationship blossomed. This guy treated me nicely and did things that I was not use to—opened the car door for me, returned my phone calls within a 24-hour period, didn’t try to act like God’s gift to women when we were together. So, my feelings for him grew faster and deeper than I had anticipated when I first met him. As the relationship progressed and emotions grew—he started to do things that I did not recognize at the time as signs of danger. It started with him calling me less than desirable names when we argued. He began to question my whereabouts and the company I kept--as a nineteen year old young lady, to me this was “cute” jealousy, at first. To make a long story short, before this relationship came to an end, I had to endure a full open-handed slap across the face, being choked within seconds of unconsciousness, being thrown down a flight of stairs outside my apartment, being slammed into a wall, and a host of harassing phone calls. Here I was thousands of miles from my family being battered and abused, both physically and mentally by a guy who I loved and I thought loved me. The relationship was the classic violence cycle of him being really nice and wonderful, a blow up with name calling and occasional physical attacks, and then the super-nice-“I’m so sorry” phase. 
I was trapped. My life was spiraling out of control, I felt alone—I could not tell my girlfriends because I was too embarrassed , I couldn’t tell my family for they were thousands of miles away, what could they have done? I did not have a church family to speak of. It was just me and I was in trouble. I was not even in the right frame of mind to go to God for help. I was able to escape this guy because he moved back to his home town which was in another state. An act of God no less, although I did not recognize this at the time.
Through all that chaos and abuse I never thought there was a reason for me enduring such an ordeal. Some years later when I was in graduate school I took a volunteer position with the shelter for battered and abused women. I was “promoted” to Volunteer Trainer and Coordinator and won Volunteer of the year. Why? Because I had “been there and done that.” I could completely relate to, sympathize, and understand these women and how they could get caught up in those types of relationships and find it hard to break loose from the cycle. My relationship in college led me to becoming essentially well versed on domestic violence and violence in dating that I’ve used for good on several occasions. For example, I have taught classes in the church to young people on recognizing the signs and cycles of an abusive situation. God took a dark, embarrassing portion of my life, used it and me to change the lives of other women and their children. “As far as I am concerned, God turned into good what you meant for evil. He brought me to the high position I have today so I could save the lives of many people”. (Genesis 50:20, NLT)
Some of us right now are going through some storms, it may be troubles in our marriages, rebellious children, illness, financial ruin, and even domestic violence. Know that what you are going through is not going to last. That storm will pass over. You must stand still and let God turn that situation around for you and then take what you have learned and enrich someone else’s life. There are situations that we find ourselves in because of our own sin and poor choices, but there are also situations that we are in because God is trying to teach us something—regardless, if you trust God all things will work together for good. “And we know that God causes everything to work together for the good of those who love God and are called according to his purpose for them.” (Romans 8:28, NLT) 
As odd as it may sound—be thankful for the hard times in your life because during these times that we actively seek God.    As Romans 5: 3-4 (NLT) tells us, “We can rejoice, too, when we run into problems and trials, for we know that they are good for us – they help us learn to endure. And endurance develops strength of character in us, and character strengthens our confident expectation of salvation.”
God’s strength is magnified in our weakness. It is these times that we really get to see the awesome, limitless power of God. In order to have a testimony about being healed you have to be sick. In order to be thankful for a meal you have to hunger. To give God the glory for freeing you from your situation, you must endure the bondage. To truly understand what someone is going through—you have to go through yourself.
 “. . . when your faith is tested, your endurance has a chance to grow. So let it grow, for when your endurance is fully developed, you will be strong in character and ready for anything.” (James 1:3-4, NLT) God can take your mess and turn it into your ministry. He can take your test and turn it into your testimony. He can turn your trial into your triumph. So, stand firm in the eye of your storm, give God all the praises and honor while it is still raining, thundering, and lighting because at the end of the storm you will immerge victorious.   
Thankful for Trials
 
By
 
Pamela A. Johnson
 
 
 
He can take our chaos and turn it into something meaningful and worthwhile.
--Joyce Meyers
 
 
 
          It was August of 1991, I was nineteen years old and just beginning my junior year in college. During my freshman and sophomore years, the guys I dated were all fellow college students, but one afternoon that would change. I was walking from campus to my off-campus apartment after spending a long, emotionally and physically draining day in the campus gymnasium registering for Fall classes. On my way home I met a man near the football stadium. I mean he was man, not a college student, he was a grown man in a brand new car. Suddenly visions flashed in my mind: dinner at somewhere other than the campus cafeteria, getting picked up in a car instead of meeting at the local subway station. I liked those visions. 
Needless to say, we exchanged phone numbers and a relationship blossomed. This guy treated me nicely and did things that I was not use to—opened the car door for me, returned my phone calls within a 24-hour period, didn’t try to act like God’s gift to women when we were together. So, my feelings for him grew faster and deeper than I had anticipated when I first met him. As the relationship progressed and emotions grew—he started to do things that I did not recognize at the time as signs of danger. It started with him calling me less than desirable names when we argued. He began to question my whereabouts and the company I kept--as a nineteen year old young lady, to me this was “cute” jealousy, at first. To make a long story short, before this relationship came to an end, I had to endure a full open-handed slap across the face, being choked within seconds of unconsciousness, being thrown down a flight of stairs outside my apartment, being slammed into a wall, and a host of harassing phone calls. Here I was thousands of miles from my family being battered and abused, both physically and mentally by a guy who I loved and I thought loved me. The relationship was the classic violence cycle of him being really nice and wonderful, a blow up with name calling and occasional physical attacks, and then the super-nice-“I’m so sorry” phase. 
I was trapped. My life was spiraling out of control, I felt alone—I could not tell my girlfriends because I was too embarrassed , I couldn’t tell my family for they were thousands of miles away, what could they have done? I did not have a church family to speak of. It was just me and I was in trouble. I was not even in the right frame of mind to go to God for help. I was able to escape this guy because he moved back to his home town which was in another state. An act of God no less, although I did not recognize this at the time.
Through all that chaos and abuse I never thought there was a reason for me enduring such an ordeal. Some years later when I was in graduate school I took a volunteer position with the shelter for battered and abused women. I was “promoted” to Volunteer Trainer and Coordinator and won Volunteer of the year. Why? Because I had “been there and done that.” I could completely relate to, sympathize, and understand these women and how they could get caught up in those types of relationships and find it hard to break loose from the cycle. My relationship in college led me to becoming essentially well versed on domestic violence and violence in dating that I’ve used for good on several occasions. For example, I have taught classes in the church to young people on recognizing the signs and cycles of an abusive situation. God took a dark, embarrassing portion of my life, used it and me to change the lives of other women and their children. “As far as I am concerned, God turned into good what you meant for evil. He brought me to the high position I have today so I could save the lives of many people”. (Genesis 50:20, NLT)
Some of us right now are going through some storms, it may be troubles in our marriages, rebellious children, illness, financial ruin, and even domestic violence. Know that what you are going through is not going to last. That storm will pass over. You must stand still and let God turn that situation around for you and then take what you have learned and enrich someone else’s life. There are situations that we find ourselves in because of our own sin and poor choices, but there are also situations that we are in because God is trying to teach us something—regardless, if you trust God all things will work together for good. “And we know that God causes everything to work together for the good of those who love God and are called according to his purpose for them.” (Romans 8:28, NLT) 
As odd as it may sound—be thankful for the hard times in your life because during these times that we actively seek God.    As Romans 5: 3-4 (NLT) tells us, “We can rejoice, too, when we run into problems and trials, for we know that they are good for us – they help us learn to endure. And endurance develops strength of character in us, and character strengthens our confident expectation of salvation.”
God’s strength is magnified in our weakness. It is these times that we really get to see the awesome, limitless power of God. In order to have a testimony about being healed you have to be sick. In order to be thankful for a meal you have to hunger. To give God the glory for freeing you from your situation, you must endure the bondage. To truly understand what someone is going through—you have to go through yourself.
 “. . . when your faith is tested, your endurance has a chance to grow. So let it grow, for when your endurance is fully developed, you will be strong in character and ready for anything.” (James 1:3-4, NLT) God can take your mess and turn it into your ministry. He can take your test and turn it into your testimony. He can turn your trial into your triumph. So, stand firm in the eye of your storm, give God all the praises and honor while it is still raining, thundering, and lighting because at the end of the storm you will immerge victorious.   
Thankful for Trials
 
By
 
Pamela A. Johnson
 
 
 
He can take our chaos and turn it into something meaningful and worthwhile.
--Joyce Meyers
 
 
 
          It was August of 1991, I was nineteen years old and just beginning my junior year in college. During my freshman and sophomore years, the guys I dated were all fellow college students, but one afternoon that would change. I was walking from campus to my off-campus apartment after spending a long, emotionally and physically draining day in the campus gymnasium registering for Fall classes. On my way home I met a man near the football stadium. I mean he was man, not a college student, he was a grown man in a brand new car. Suddenly visions flashed in my mind: dinner at somewhere other than the campus cafeteria, getting picked up in a car instead of meeting at the local subway station. I liked those visions. 
Needless to say, we exchanged phone numbers and a relationship blossomed. This guy treated me nicely and did things that I was not use to—opened the car door for me, returned my phone calls within a 24-hour period, didn’t try to act like God’s gift to women when we were together. So, my feelings for him grew faster and deeper than I had anticipated when I first met him. As the relationship progressed and emotions grew—he started to do things that I did not recognize at the time as signs of danger. It started with him calling me less than desirable names when we argued. He began to question my whereabouts and the company I kept--as a nineteen year old young lady, to me this was “cute” jealousy, at first. To make a long story short, before this relationship came to an end, I had to endure a full open-handed slap across the face, being choked within seconds of unconsciousness, being thrown down a flight of stairs outside my apartment, being slammed into a wall, and a host of harassing phone calls. Here I was thousands of miles from my family being battered and abused, both physically and mentally by a guy who I loved and I thought loved me. The relationship was the classic violence cycle of him being really nice and wonderful, a blow up with name calling and occasional physical attacks, and then the super-nice-“I’m so sorry” phase. 
I was trapped. My life was spiraling out of control, I felt alone—I could not tell my girlfriends because I was too embarrassed , I couldn’t tell my family for they were thousands of miles away, what could they have done? I did not have a church family to speak of. It was just me and I was in trouble. I was not even in the right frame of mind to go to God for help. I was able to escape this guy because he moved back to his home town which was in another state. An act of God no less, although I did not recognize this at the time.
Through all that chaos and abuse I never thought there was a reason for me enduring such an ordeal. Some years later when I was in graduate school I took a volunteer position with the shelter for battered and abused women. I was “promoted” to Volunteer Trainer and Coordinator and won Volunteer of the year. Why? Because I had “been there and done that.” I could completely relate to, sympathize, and understand these women and how they could get caught up in those types of relationships and find it hard to break loose from the cycle. My relationship in college led me to becoming essentially well versed on domestic violence and violence in dating that I’ve used for good on several occasions. For example, I have taught classes in the church to young people on recognizing the signs and cycles of an abusive situation. God took a dark, embarrassing portion of my life, used it and me to change the lives of other women and their children. “As far as I am concerned, God turned into good what you meant for evil. He brought me to the high position I have today so I could save the lives of many people”. (Genesis 50:20, NLT)
Some of us right now are going through some storms, it may be troubles in our marriages, rebellious children, illness, financial ruin, and even domestic violence. Know that what you are going through is not going to last. That storm will pass over. You must stand still and let God turn that situation around for you and then take what you have learned and enrich someone else’s life. There are situations that we find ourselves in because of our own sin and poor choices, but there are also situations that we are in because God is trying to teach us something—regardless, if you trust God all things will work together for good. “And we know that God causes everything to work together for the good of those who love God and are called according to his purpose for them.” (Romans 8:28, NLT) 
As odd as it may sound—be thankful for the hard times in your life because during these times that we actively seek God.    As Romans 5: 3-4 (NLT) tells us, “We can rejoice, too, when we run into problems and trials, for we know that they are good for us – they help us learn to endure. And endurance develops strength of character in us, and character strengthens our confident expectation of salvation.”
God’s strength is magnified in our weakness. It is these times that we really get to see the awesome, limitless power of God. In order to have a testimony about being healed you have to be sick. In order to be thankful for a meal you have to hunger. To give God the glory for freeing you from your situation, you must endure the bondage. To truly understand what someone is going through—you have to go through yourself.
 “. . . when your faith is tested, your endurance has a chance to grow. So let it grow, for when your endurance is fully developed, you will be strong in character and ready for anything.” (James 1:3-4, NLT) God can take your mess and turn it into your ministry. He can take your test and turn it into your testimony. He can turn your trial into your triumph. So, stand firm in the eye of your storm, give God all the praises and honor while it is still raining, thundering, and lighting because at the end of the storm you will immerge victorious.   
Thankful for Trials
 
By
 
Pamela A. Johnson
 
 
 
He can take our chaos and turn it into something meaningful and worthwhile.
--Joyce Meyers
 
 
 
          It was August of 1991, I was nineteen years old and just beginning my junior year in college. During my freshman and sophomore years, the guys I dated were all fellow college students, but one afternoon that would change. I was walking from campus to my off-campus apartment after spending a long, emotionally and physically draining day in the campus gymnasium registering for Fall classes. On my way home I met a man near the football stadium. I mean he was man, not a college student, he was a grown man in a brand new car. Suddenly visions flashed in my mind: dinner at somewhere other than the campus cafeteria, getting picked up in a car instead of meeting at the local subway station. I liked those visions. 
Needless to say, we exchanged phone numbers and a relationship blossomed. This guy treated me nicely and did things that I was not use to—opened the car door for me, returned my phone calls within a 24-hour period, didn’t try to act like God’s gift to women when we were together. So, my feelings for him grew faster and deeper than I had anticipated when I first met him. As the relationship progressed and emotions grew—he started to do things that I did not recognize at the time as signs of danger. It started with him calling me less than desirable names when we argued. He began to question my whereabouts and the company I kept--as a nineteen year old young lady, to me this was “cute” jealousy, at first. To make a long story short, before this relationship came to an end, I had to endure a full open-handed slap across the face, being choked within seconds of unconsciousness, being thrown down a flight of stairs outside my apartment, being slammed into a wall, and a host of harassing phone calls. Here I was thousands of miles from my family being battered and abused, both physically and mentally by a guy who I loved and I thought loved me. The relationship was the classic violence cycle of him being really nice and wonderful, a blow up with name calling and occasional physical attacks, and then the super-nice-“I’m so sorry” phase. 
I was trapped. My life was spiraling out of control, I felt alone—I could not tell my girlfriends because I was too embarrassed , I couldn’t tell my family for they were thousands of miles away, what could they have done? I did not have a church family to speak of. It was just me and I was in trouble. I was not even in the right frame of mind to go to God for help. I was able to escape this guy because he moved back to his home town which was in another state. An act of God no less, although I did not recognize this at the time.
Through all that chaos and abuse I never thought there was a reason for me enduring such an ordeal. Some years later when I was in graduate school I took a volunteer position with the shelter for battered and abused women. I was “promoted” to Volunteer Trainer and Coordinator and won Volunteer of the year. Why? Because I had “been there and done that.” I could completely relate to, sympathize, and understand these women and how they could get caught up in those types of relationships and find it hard to break loose from the cycle. My relationship in college led me to becoming essentially well versed on domestic violence and violence in dating that I’ve used for good on several occasions. For example, I have taught classes in the church to young people on recognizing the signs and cycles of an abusive situation. God took a dark, embarrassing portion of my life, used it and me to change the lives of other women and their children. “As far as I am concerned, God turned into good what you meant for evil. He brought me to the high position I have today so I could save the lives of many people”. (Genesis 50:20, NLT)
Some of us right now are going through some storms, it may be troubles in our marriages, rebellious children, illness, financial ruin, and even domestic violence. Know that what you are going through is not going to last. That storm will pass over. You must stand still and let God turn that situation around for you and then take what you have learned and enrich someone else’s life. There are situations that we find ourselves in because of our own sin and poor choices, but there are also situations that we are in because God is trying to teach us something—regardless, if you trust God all things will work together for good. “And we know that God causes everything to work together for the good of those who love God and are called according to his purpose for them.” (Romans 8:28, NLT) 
As odd as it may sound—be thankful for the hard times in your life because during these times that we actively seek God.    As Romans 5: 3-4 (NLT) tells us, “We can rejoice, too, when we run into problems and trials, for we know that they are good for us – they help us learn to endure. And endurance develops strength of character in us, and character strengthens our confident expectation of salvation.”
God’s strength is magnified in our weakness. It is these times that we really get to see the awesome, limitless power of God. In order to have a testimony about being healed you have to be sick. In order to be thankful for a meal you have to hunger. To give God the glory for freeing you from your situation, you must endure the bondage. To truly understand what someone is going through—you have to go through yourself.
 “. . . when your faith is tested, your endurance has a chance to grow. So let it grow, for when your endurance is fully developed, you will be strong in character and ready for anything.” (James 1:3-4, NLT) God can take your mess and turn it into your ministry. He can take your test and turn it into your testimony. He can turn your trial into your triumph. So, stand firm in the eye of your storm, give God all the praises and honor while it is still raining, thundering, and lighting because at the end of the storm you will immerge victorious.   
 
Thankful for Trials
 
By
 
Pamela A. Johnson
 
 
 
He can take our chaos and turn it into something meaningful and worthwhile.
--Joyce Meyers
 
 
 
          It was August of 1991, I was nineteen years old and just beginning my junior year in college. During my freshman and sophomore years, the guys I dated were all fellow college students, but one afternoon that would change. I was walking from campus to my off-campus apartment after spending a long, emotionally and physically draining day in the campus gymnasium registering for Fall classes. On my way home I met a man near the football stadium. I mean he was man, not a college student, he was a grown man in a brand new car. Suddenly visions flashed in my mind: dinner at somewhere other than the campus cafeteria, getting picked up in a car instead of meeting at the local subway station. I liked those visions. 
Needless to say, we exchanged phone numbers and a relationship blossomed. This guy treated me nicely and did things that I was not use to—opened the car door for me, returned my phone calls within a 24-hour period, didn’t try to act like God’s gift to women when we were together. So, my feelings for him grew faster and deeper than I had anticipated when I first met him. As the relationship progressed and emotions grew—he started to do things that I did not recognize at the time as signs of danger. It started with him calling me less than desirable names when we argued. He began to question my whereabouts and the company I kept--as a nineteen year old young lady, to me this was “cute” jealousy, at first. To make a long story short, before this relationship came to an end, I had to endure a full open-handed slap across the face, being choked within seconds of unconsciousness, being thrown down a flight of stairs outside my apartment, being slammed into a wall, and a host of harassing phone calls. Here I was thousands of miles from my family being battered and abused, both physically and mentally by a guy who I loved and I thought loved me. The relationship was the classic violence cycle of him being really nice and wonderful, a blow up with name calling and occasional physical attacks, and then the super-nice-“I’m so sorry” phase. 
I was trapped. My life was spiraling out of control, I felt alone—I could not tell my girlfriends because I was too embarrassed , I couldn’t tell my family for they were thousands of miles away, what could they have done? I did not have a church family to speak of. It was just me and I was in trouble. I was not even in the right frame of mind to go to God for help. I was able to escape this guy because he moved back to his home town which was in another state. An act of God no less, although I did not recognize this at the time.
Through all that chaos and abuse I never thought there was a reason for me enduring such an ordeal. Some years later when I was in graduate school I took a volunteer position with the shelter for battered and abused women. I was “promoted” to Volunteer Trainer and Coordinator and won Volunteer of the year. Why? Because I had “been there and done that.” I could completely relate to, sympathize, and understand these women and how they could get caught up in those types of relationships and find it hard to break loose from the cycle. My relationship in college led me to becoming essentially well versed on domestic violence and violence in dating that I’ve used for good on several occasions. For example, I have taught classes in the church to young people on recognizing the signs and cycles of an abusive situation. God took a dark, embarrassing portion of my life, used it and me to change the lives of other women and their children. “As far as I am concerned, God turned into good what you meant for evil. He brought me to the high position I have today so I could save the lives of many people”. (Genesis 50:20, NLT)
Some of us right now are going through some storms, it may be troubles in our marriages, rebellious children, illness, financial ruin, and even domestic violence. Know that what you are going through is not going to last. That storm will pass over. You must stand still and let God turn that situation around for you and then take what you have learned and enrich someone else’s life. There are situations that we find ourselves in because of our own sin and poor choices, but there are also situations that we are in because God is trying to teach us something—regardless, if you trust God all things will work together for good. “And we know that God causes everything to work together for the good of those who love God and are called according to his purpose for them.” (Romans 8:28, NLT) 
As odd as it may sound—be thankful for the hard times in your life because during these times that we actively seek God.    As Romans 5: 3-4 (NLT) tells us, “We can rejoice, too, when we run into problems and trials, for we know that they are good for us – they help us learn to endure. And endurance develops strength of character in us, and character strengthens our confident expectation of salvation.”
God’s strength is magnified in our weakness. It is these times that we really get to see the awesome, limitless power of God. In order to have a testimony about being healed you have to be sick. In order to be thankful for a meal you have to hunger. To give God the glory for freeing you from your situation, you must endure the bondage. To truly understand what someone is going through—you have to go through yourself.
 “. . . when your faith is tested, your endurance has a chance to grow. So let it grow, for when your endurance is fully developed, you will be strong in character and ready for anything.” (James 1:3-4, NLT) God can take your mess and turn it into your ministry. He can take your test and turn it into your testimony. He can turn your trial into your triumph. So, stand firm in the eye of your storm, give God all the praises and honor while it is still raining, thundering, and lighting because at the end of the storm you will immerge victorious.   
  April 2017  
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